Alexander Calder, Antennae with Red and Blue Dots 1953 © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

Alexander Calder, Antennae with Red and Blue Dots 1953 © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

Alexander Calder is the inventor of the „mobile“. By definition: „A type of sculpture that is formed of delicate components which are suspended in the air and move in response to air currents or motor power.“ Calder travelled to Paris in the 1920s, having originally trained as an engineer, and by 1931 he had invented the mobile. The term was coined by Marcel Duchamp to describe Calder’s sculptures which moved of their own accord.

Calder’s subtle balance of form and colour resulted in works that suggest an animated version of paintings by friends such as Joan Miró.

In the exhibition „Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture“ the Tate Modern brings into focus these light and fragile objects. The show will reveal how motion, performance and theatricality underpinned his practice and showcase his collaborative projects in the fields of film, theatre, music and dance.

Exhibition: Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture, until April 3rd, 2016, Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG, United Kingdom

Image: Alexander Calder, Triple Gong c.1948, Calder Foundation, New York / Art Resource, NY © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015